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Exhibition runs until 24 May

 

ADMISSION FREE

 

PLEASE NOTE THAT THE EXHIBITION IS CLOSED TO THE PUBLIC ON WEDNESDAY 18 MAY AND THURSDAY 29 MAY. WE APOLOGISE FOR ANY INCONVENIENCE

 

Opening times:

Monday to Thursday 10am - 3pm (Monday 7 March to Tuesday 24 May 2022)

Also open during events (please see listings)

Occasionally we may have to temporarily close the exhibition to the public due to recordings or events taking place on site. We always try to keep disruption to a minimum and give as much notice as possible. Please check the website before you visit to avoid disappointment - thank you.

If you cannot attend during these times, please contact us on This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. We are often able to accommodate visits at other times.

 

 

‘I know that extinction is happening all around us, not because I have been told so, but because I grew up surrounded by

an abundance of brown trout, bullheads, green plovers, eels, water voles and now I see almost none in what is a shrinking habitat. 

 

My work emerged out of this abundance I experienced around me. Now it is an act of rebellion against the loss that surrounds us all.

My hope is that my images help people understand the balance of nature that is under our feet; I want them to be about the future,

not the past. My fear is that, like my use of elm, my work will become a testimony to what once was, nature fossilized in wood'.  

      Julian Meredith

 

Julian Meredith is an artist printmaker and beekeeper. His art rails against the loss of habitat and the extinction of familiar creatures. His subject matter is fish, birds, animals and insects, their relationship to their environment and to us. 

 

Meredith's powerful life-size images in his signature Prussian blue are meticulously transferred by hand from the bodies of dead animals onto cotton rag or Korean paper. His work also includes hand-burnished prints from large planks of elm, a species largely lost to disease. The printmaking process impregnates the wood with pigment and paraffin making the wood appear fossilized. The resulting prints have a light, airy quality, the opposite to the nature of the wood itself. As the printed paper comes up off the block Meredith describes it as ‘like the spirit of the fossilized wood’.

 

Consciously aware of the restrictions of art for the indoors, he has also created site-specific sand drawings and landworks including a 525 foot raised beach white whale on Colonsay, an island in the Inner Hebrides of Scotland.

 

The title of this exhibition - MIGRATION - represents a natural phenomena which is an endless source of fascination for Meredith. But it is also a timely warning of consequences of climate change which could lead to waves of global migration and remapping of populations. 

 

Julian Meredith (b 1952) trained at Exeter College of Art. He has had numerous solo exhibitions in prestigious galleries since 1992 and shown in group shows since 1989, often in the RA Summer Show. Collections include the Victoria and Albert Museum; the Natural History Museum; Cartwright Hall, Bradford; Deutsche Bank and British Telecom.

 

Meredith Migration press release click here

 

Photo credit: Alan Fentiman

 

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